Halloween #HumpDayHaunts

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Starting November, I’ll be back to my regular blogging. Until then, please follow me on Instagram for some haunted history each day this week!

If you don’t follow me already, you might not know about #humpdayhaunts. Each Wednesday I share a bit of paranormal history. Since it is Halloween, I thought I’d do it all week long. Come join the fun (or horror)!

6 Things Haunting Me This Week

 

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Each Friday, I’m going to share spooky reads and products that are haunting me. Maybe it is an article I read that I cannot stop thinking about. Maybe it is something I cannot wait to purchase on payday. Please note, this post is 100% my recommendations. Products featured are not ads. I just really love them! 

Treats

Laurie A. Conley draws the cutest damn ghosts. Laurie will also draw your house as a haunted house. What a great housewarming gift for a spooky friend. Cough cough, that friend is me.

I thought this was fun. Find your sign and see what type of ghost you’ll be!

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Reads

Mary Shelley’s Obsession with the Cemetery – JSTOR Daily – Bess Lovejoy 

“The author of Frankenstein always saw love and death as connected. She visited the cemetery to commune with her dead mother. And with her lover.”

First Kill the Witches. Then, Celebrate Them – New York Times, Opinion – Stacy Schiff

“How did Salem, Mass., repackage a tragedy as a holiday, appointing itself ‘Witch City’ in the process?

The Horror Oscars: The Best Scary Movies of Every Year Since 1978’s ‘Halloween’ – The Ringer – Sean Fennessey 

“Horror movies are almost always passed over come Oscar season. It’s time to correct that sin.”

Charley, The Haunted Doll – Atlas Obscura 

“Rumored to have tormented a family in the late 1960s, this toy now resides in a quiet little oddities shop.”

 

Featured Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

6 Things Haunting Me This Week

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Each Friday, I’m going to share spooky reads and products that are haunting me. Maybe it is an article I read that I cannot stop thinking about. Maybe it is something I cannot wait to purchase on payday. Please note, this post is 100% my recommendations. Products featured are not ads. I just really love them! 

Treats

Remember the story “The Green Ribbon” from the book In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories? If you are unfamiliar with the story: I’ve blogged about it here.

One of my favorite pin shops, Krystan Saint Cat, made these buttons. I gasped! You can buy them here.

I have been really obsessing over this account on Instagram. I mean look at these candles! Can you spot the tiny ghost, pumpkins, and cat? And those shades of purple.

This batch is appearing in a shop update on September 23rd, noon PST. Will you be refreshing your screen with me?

Reads

Halloween: Death Makes a Holiday – Nourishing Death

“I’m going to take a look at how the holiday and the foods associated with it have changed over the decades through sharing examples of menus and descriptions in various journals, cookbooks and magazines.”

Cursed Paintings: Ill-Fated Portraits and Unlucky Landscapes – Folklore Thursday 

“The cursed painting is an enduring urban legend that continues to have the ability to scare us, and also makes a good tabloid news story.” 

Sarah Chavez on Death Positivity, Grief, and Intersetional Feminism – Luna Luna Magazine 

Two people I really admire having a really great conversation. 

I came across this piece of folklore on Twitter. I love the idea of ghosts traveling internationally.

 

Featured Image: Photo by Gianni Zanato on Unsplash

Til Death: Ghost Brides of the United States

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I am in the middle of planning a (goth rustic) wedding, which I do not enjoy doing. I was just not wired to be a bride. Instead of calling caterers or sending out invitations, I have been looking up ghost stories about brides. There are a lot of them. I could go into the theories behind why there are so many, but I’m just here to tell some stories!

The stories that started all this research were urban legends I heard as a child.

There are several versions of this first story, but they basically go like this. A young woman, groom, and some of their wedding guests decided to play a game of hide-and-seek in a large mansion used for the wedding reception (one version say it was the father-of-the-bride’s house). Someone other than the bride was designated as “it” (some versions say the maid of honor, others say the groom). Everyone was found, but the bride. Friends and family searched the house for hours, days, and weeks. A missing person report was filed. Eventually, the groom had to move on with his life. One day in the far off future, someone was cleaning the house. They opened a large chest in the attic and found a skeleton in a tattered wedding dress. It seemed that the lid of the chest shut on the bride when she used it as a hiding place. She was unable to open the lid and she suffocated to death (some say the heavy lid crushed her skull).

Another legend I grew up hearing involves a deadly wedding dress. There are many versions of this story, too. Sometimes it is not even a wedding dress. The story goes that a dead young woman was to be buried in her wedding dress, but her parents decided last minute to bury her in another dress. Since the wedding dress was expensive, they sold it for profit. This dress ended up in the hands of a another young woman as she needed it for a community dance. The entire night of the dance, the dress gave off an odor and she felt very faint. Her date decided to take her home, since she was not feeling well. She did not make it home alive. Her date told the doctor about the odor. The doctor investigated and found formaldehyde in her veins, which had caused her blood to coagulated and stop flowing (I don’t know). When they asked the store about the dress, they revealed that they received it from a funeral home and it had been worn by a corpse. The dancing most likely caused the young woman to sweat, which opened her pores and took in formaldehyde.

I am not sure why revisiting such dreadful stories brings me comfort during the stress of planning my own big day, but nevertheless it sent me down a rabbit hole full of ghost brides. The best way to avoid wedding tasks, I suppose! Enjoy the following bits of paranormal history involving brides, grooms, and haunted wedding dresses.

joel-overbeck-657174-unsplashOld Faithful Inn  (Yellowstone National Park)

The inn itself is very haunted. A woman staying in Room 2 reported a woman dressed in 1890s clothes floating at the end of her bed. People have also reported the fire extinguisher moving and doors opening and closing. The most interesting ghost, though, is the headless bride. People have reported a woman in a white dress drifting across the Crow’s Nest, holding her head under her arm. According to legend, the bride was a young woman from 1915 New York that, despite her wealthy father’s wishes, married a much older male servant. Her father provided them a one-time dowry of a substantial amount with the agreement that they would not ask for money ever again and would leave New York forever. They married and headed to Yellowstone National Park for their honeymoon (staying in Room 127 of Old Faithful Inn). On their way to Yellowstone, the groom spent most of the money on gambling and booze. A month into their honeymoon, their dowry was gone. This led to intense arguments between the couple, which was heard by hotel staff. One day the husband stormed out and never returned. The hotel staff thought they might give the heartbroken wife her space and after a few days decided to check in on her. The maid found the young bride bloody in the bathtub. Her head was no where to be found. A couple days later, an odor in the Crow’s Nest led staff to…her head.

Dauphine Orleans Hotel (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A young courtesan named Millie worked in May’s Place, a bar in the Dauphine Orleans Hotel. The morning of her wedding, her groom-to-be was shot dead in a gambling dispute. Millie, from that point on and even after death, walked around the bar in her wedding dress. She still walks around the Dauphine in her wedding dress today, waiting for her fiancé to return.

Driskill Hotel (Austin, Texas)

Room 525 is haunted by two brides. Allegedly two young women ended their lives in the room on their honeymoons, 20 years apart. The room was closed for a time and then eventually reopened for renovations. The renovations brought about some paranormal activity including apparitions, weird sensations, unexplained leaks, distant voices, and other odd noises.

Hotel Galvez (Galveston, Texas)

Since her death in the 1950s, a ghost bride haunts Room 501 in Hotel Galvez. Her fiancé wasources a mariner and she, when expecting his return, would watch the sea from the hotel. One tragic day, she watched as his ship sank and soon after ended her life. He had actually survived and returned to heartbreak. She still walks the halls, scaring guests. One guest in Room 501 abruptly left the hotel at 3 a.m. in tears. 

City Tavern (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

A bride and her bridesmaids were preparing for the wedding when one bridesmaid accidentally knocked over a candle, setting the curtains on fire. The fire spread throughout the tavern, taking the lives of the bride and her bridesmaids.  The ghost of the bride is active today, especially during wedding events at the tavern. Some wedding photographers have even reported seeing her apparition appearing next to the (living) bride when looking through the camera viewfinder. Although, no one has caught her on film.

Emily Morgan Hotel (San Antonio, Texas)

The Emily Morgan Hotel resides in a building erected in the 1920s; the hotel itself was established in the 1980s. The building, first used as a Medical Arts building, is lined with gargoyles portraying a different medical ailment. Such an astonishing building comes with some astonishing ghost stories, of course. The seventh floor of the thirteen-floor building is haunted by a ghost bride. Her backstory is unknown. Visitors of the hotel have called down to the front desk after hearing loud shrieks. Hotel staff simply reply, “We’re sorry, but we do think it might be a ghost responsible for that.”

Hotel Conneaut (Erie, Pennsylvania)

Elizabeth and her new husband stayed in Room 321 on their honeymoon. Their blissful vacation was interrupted by a raging fire in the hotel. The husband was able to get out alive, but Elizabeth was trapped in the room and died. The heartbroken bride still roams the third floor, looking for her husband and sobbing. Wearing a wedding dress, she leaves behind the smell of jasmine.

The Alpha Gamma Delta House at University of Georgia (Athens, Georgia)

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Thomas Cooper Gotch, Death the Bride

The AGD sorority house at the University of Georgia once housed the wealthy families of Athens. The mansion was built by William Winstead Thomas in 1896 as an engagement gift for his daughter, Isabel, and her fiance, Richard W. Johnson. The house is often called “the wedding cake house,” because of this. Isabel ended her life in the house after Richard left her at the altar. The house went through a couple of hands before becoming a sorority house.

According to several reports, the scorned bride is still active in the house. Paranormal activity includes faucets turning on, lights turning on and off by themselves, doors opening by themselves, and faces appearing in the window. One sorority sister named Sarah lived in the “Engagement” room and described her experiences :”The door to my bedroom and my roommate’s closet door randomly swing open on their own […] I swear that the ghost who lives here is doing it. It really freaks me out.”

Long Island Campgrounds (Bolton Landing, New York)

The state campground has 90 sites over 100 acres. In the 1960s, a new husband and wife decided it was the perfect location for their honeymoon. They were allegedly murdered in their sleep while camping. The bride now wanders the grounds, looking for her husband among the living campers.

Phelps Grove Park (Springfield, Illinois)

When driving over a bridge in Phelps Grove Park, a newly married couple lost control of the car and both died. The bride still haunts the location. She can be seen holding the hem of her wedding dress. Her face is only darkness.

Curves (Onondaga Hill, New York)

A similar story appears in Onondaga Hill folklore. About 60 years ago, a young couple died in a car crash on a very snaky road just after their wedding. People claim to see the bride on Halloween. Her glowing figure floats down the road in a wedding gown, searching for her husband. Some say she carries a bright orange lantern. To read more about this legend, visit Weird New York.

Baker Mansion (Altoona, Pennsylvania)

Anna Baker, the daughter of the rich Elias Baker, fell in love with a local steelworker. Her father forbade her to marry him, because he was of lower class. She died alone. Much later, The Baker Mansion (in Altoona, PA) was made into a museum and a wedding dress was put on display in a glass case in Anna’s bedroom. When there is a full moon, the dress violently shakes, sometimes to the point of almost breaking the glass. Myth says she is so mad she never got to wear a wedding dress, and therefore shakes it in anger. Some people often report seeing it dance by itself (with the shoes tapping along).

Some Small Town (North Dakota)

The book Haunted America by Michael Norman and Beth Scott tells a spooky story of giphy (2)sisterly jealousy in the 1930s. Sisters Lorna Mae and Carol were complete opposites. Lorna Mae, the youngest sister, was strong, cheerful, and a hard worker. The older sister, Carol, was reportedly more attractive, grumpy, and lazy. They both fell in love with a widower with three children, Ben. Ben chose Lorna Mae to be his wife, imagining the both of them working side-by-side on the farm. Carol was very angry. Shouldn’t he be with the prettier one?

Shortly before the wedding, Lorna Mae suffered abdominal pains. Carol was nearby and was sent to get the doctor. She returned saying she could not find a doctor in town. It is believed she lied and even dawdled in town. Lorna Mae was rushed to town, but died of a ruptured appendix shortly after arriving.

Carol set out to marry Ben. She even demanded the undertaker to remove the wedding dress from Lorna Mae’s dead body before the burial. A month after the funeral, Carol was able to convince Ben to marry her. Their wedding was in mid-July in 100-degree heat. Carol look beautiful in Lorna Mae’s high neck wedding dress. During the festivities, though, Carol began to sway and grab at her throat. She died in Ben’s arms.

The autopsy revealed that it could not be heatstroke. The wedding dress had absorbed some of the embalming fluid while on Lorna Mae. The hot weather caused Carol to sweat, which opened her pores and allowed the fluid to enter.

Well, I’m back at that same childhood legend. I still do not have a wedding dress for my own wedding, but I’ll tell you what: I won’t be going vintage.

***Please note: the stories shared are legend. While they may have factual elements, they should be consumed with an “ALLEGEDLY” lens. 

 

Featured Image: Photo by Alex Dukhanov on Unsplash

6 Things Haunting Me This Week

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Each Friday, I’m going to share spooky reads and products that are haunting me. Maybe it is an article I read that I cannot stop thinking about. Maybe it is something I cannot wait to purchase on payday. Please note, this post is 100% my recommendations. Products featured are not ads. I just really love them! 

Treats

So, I have been really treating my self to ghosts lately.

I found this vintage (like 1970/80s) ghost luminary online and it watches me as I “work” on my dissertation. This piece was made using a Byron Mold, which is a company that produced molds for ceramics. So this piece was created (and painted) by some random person using the mold, which I think adds a personal touch to the piece. Maybe your grandparents had one?

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Want a cheaper ghost experience? Have a hot chocolate with a ghost Peep! Perfect for children or nostalgic ghost bloggers. Come on, it’s cute.

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Reads

Walking The Pendle Witch Trail – Inner Lives

“Ever since I started working on early modern witchcraft I’d felt the strange pull of Pendle, the borough in East Lancashire where – in one of the most notorious trials in England – eleven people were tried as witches in 1612, ten of whom were found guilty and hanged. Thus, one Friday in late June (just before the heatwave took hold), I found myself on a train to the North West to spend a long weekend in England’s other witch country.”

Ghosts and ghouls haunt the living with a message about life – aeon

“There is, it would seem, no greater chasm than that which divides the living from the dead.”

Mekurabe – Yokai.com

You all must know by now that I’m obsessed with this site. This recent addition to the Japanese ghost database really caught my attention! 

Hurricane Florence Gets Scarier with Sightings of the Gray Man Ghost – Mysterious Universe 

“Hurricane Florence was already being predicted to be one of the worst hurricanes to ever hit the coasts of North and South Carolina. Then the Gray Man ghost started appearing and people REALLY got scared.”

 

 

 

Featured Photo by Samuel Holt on Unsplash

6 Things Haunting Me This Week

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Each Friday, I’m going to share spooky reads and products that are haunting me. Maybe it is an article I read that I cannot stop thinking about. Maybe it is something I cannot wait to purchase on payday. Please note, this post is 100% my recommendations. Products featured are not ads. I just really love them! 

Treats

The Folio Society, creators of crafted editions of your literary favorites, just released their Autumn Collection. My personal library is 80% anthologies of spooky short stories and BOY AM I IN TROUBLE. They released The Folio Anthology of Horror Stories. The cover and accompanying illustrations are just beautiful. Can I add this to my wedding registry?

So, I love whiskey and Halloween. Luckily, I found an Old Fashioned glass from World Market with a cute vintage cat and jack-o-lantern. You can get a pair of glasses for less than $10 (+shipping).

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My usual Sunday morning is hot coffee, a good ghost book, and baked goods. One of my favorite autumn-inspired, Sunday morning breakfasts is Pumpkin Streusel Coffeecake from King Arthur Flour. There’s cinnamon filling, people.

Reads

Before TV, Kids Would Flock to Midnight Ghost Shows – Paleofuture

“Midnight ghost shows (sometimes called “spook,” “voodoo,” or “monster” shows) promised a night of creepy and playful stunts. There were glowing ghosts, floating objects, psychic readings and dozens of other illusions, all playing off the nation’s interest in spiritualism between the two World Wars.”

Kay’s Cross: Polygamists, Cult Leaders & Satanic Panic – The Dead History 

A new post from my favorite blog! Jennifer, a paranormal researcher and historian, finds the human voice in urban legends! 

“Telling the Bees” – JSTOR Daily 

“In nineteenth-century New England, it was held to be essential to whisper to beehives of a loved one’s death.”

 

6 Things Haunting Me This Week

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Hello. I’m going to try something out. Each Friday, I’m going to share spooky reads and products that are haunting me. Maybe it is an article I read that I cannot stop thinking about. Maybe it is something I cannot wait to purchase on payday.

Please note, this post is 100% my recommendations. Products featured are not ads. I just really love them! 

Treats

I just came across a new (to me) spooky candle company: Werther & Gray. I am especially in awe of their packaging. I cannot wait to get a hold of my first candle!

One of the first Halloween purchases I’ve made this season was this ghost mug from Pottery Barn. Good quality, decent price, cute ghost face.

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If you are in the market for a new tarot deck, might I recommend The Marigold Tarot? The skeleton imagery is simply breathtaking. I was able to get my hands on the gold gilded deck, but it’s sold out! You can wait until the restock or buy the Classic deck.

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Reads

Do Animals Experience Grief? – Smithsonian.com

“A growing body of evidence points to how animals are aware of death and will sometimes mourn for or ritualize their dead”

Ghosts on the shore – aeon 

“In Japan, ghost stories are not to be scoffed at, but provide deep insights into the fuzzy boundary between life and death”

7 Questions to Ask Before Buying Halloween Decor – Spooky Little Halloween 

If you like Halloween decor like me, it’s hard to control those impulse buys! Here’s a helpful post from Spooky Little Halloween to help make responsible and fun purchases.

Featured Photo by Marko Blažević on Unsplash

New Orleans & A Cursed Nicolas Cage

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I traveled to New Orleans this past week for work. What did I do with my free time? Visited cemeteries and haunted locations, of course. A common thread I found on my guided tours of New Orleans was a disdain for Nicolas Cage.

Here’s how the story goes (according to local lore/rumor/facts)…

giphy (3).gifNicolas Cage loves New Orleans (who wouldn’t; it’s a great city). He also loves the occult. He purchased two cursed properties in New Orleans (2007): LaLaurie Mansion and the historic Our Lady of Perpetual Help Chapel. He purchased the LaLaurie Mansion, because he figured “it would be a good place in which to write the great American horror novel.” In 2009, he lost the properties to foreclosure. They were worth $6.8 million.

Rumor says he was having nightmares after purchasing/losing (it’s unclear) these cursed properties and sought advice from a psychic/medium. He was informed to buy a grave as close to famous voodoo priestess Marie Laveau as possible. This is very difficult, you see. She is buried in St. Louis Cemetery #1, which is completely packed. Nicolas Cage had money and was able to convince the diocese to make room for his nine-foot-tall white pyramid. His name is not on the future memorial, but it has the Latin phrase “Omni Ab Uno,” which translates to “Everything From One.” What does this all mean? There are theories.

giphy (1)Cage was able to keep his memorial, as I was told on a tour, because the IRS cannot take cemetery plots. The tomb, for good reason, pissed off a lot of people in New Orleans. Many accuse him of having bodies moved to make room for his pyramid. Fans have left lipstick kisses on his tomb, so not everyone is a hater.

Local lore says “the curse” not only caused Cage to lose his New Orleans properties, but also caused the downfall of his career. Though, some could argue that happened way before the curse. I was also told on a tour that his tomb (not even the tallest in the cemetery) was struck by lightning. Was Cage cursed? Or does he make poor life choices?

Spooky Road Trip: The Haunted America Conference

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This Saturday, I drove nine hours total (in some very foggy conditions) to hear some of my favorite paranormal scholars speak about ghosts and other supernatural beings. Since this was my very first conference in the area of the paranormal, I did not know what to expect. I have been to many academic conferences, which can sometimes be very intimidating and stuffy. What I found at the Haunted America Conference was a friendly and welcoming group of people, with interesting stories and insights. I left with my commonplace book full of new avenues of research, along with ideas for growing my own “ghost business.”

The conference was two days with a variety of speakers during the day and activities in the evening. I, needing to work on my dissertation, only attended Saturday’s day sessions (woke up at 3 a.m….I love ghosts!). The evening activities looked so interesting–ghost hunts, a dumb supper, technical workshops, walking tours–and I look forward to signing up next year. When not in sessions, I walked around the Vendors Room and conversed with folks promoting their podcasts, publications, ghost tourism businesses, and products (candles, pendulums, jewelry). There was also an extensive raffle that read like my Christmas List. Unfortunately, I didn’t win the Ouija cheese board and Walking Dead wine.

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A view of the Vendors Room.

Below are some of my conference highlights.

  • I  finally met Colin Dickey and Sarah Chavez! Colin, author of Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places, presented on American grave robbers. I especially enjoyed how the history of medical colleges were woven into the narrative. Sarah Chavez, my favorite death feminist, spoke about the relationship between food and death. Check out more of her work at Nourishing Death and Death and The Maiden. Side note: Sarah had very cool nails.
  • I met one of my favorite bloggers, Jennifer Jones of The Dead History. Once a paranormal investigator, Jennifer now runs a blog full of very extensive historical research on haunted locations and tombstones. I really appreciate the humanist approach she brings to her research.
  • I read so many Rosemary Ellen Guiley books when I was growing up. In her presentation “Strange Encounters and Strange Things,” Rosemary shared stories about werewolves, aliens, cursed objects, and other strange creatures.
  • I also grew up reading the website Prairie Ghosts, so I knew I had to attend a conference hosted by Troy Taylor and his Haunted America team. Troy has written 120 books on ghosts, hauntings, history, crime and the unexplained in America. So, he knows his stuff. He presented on the relationship between music, death, and the devil. He’s a very entertaining speaker; he reminded me of a very cool radio DJ. 
  • I met the very kind folks of the See You On The Other Side podcast. Their website describes their work as “a rock band’s journey into the afterlife, UFOs, entertainment, and weird science.” Their podcast, as I understand, discusses a supernatural topic each episode and includes a song inspired by the subject matter. A creative idea, right? They entertained us during breaks the entire conference. I look forward to giving their podcast a listen!

Overall, it was definitely worth the nine-hour drive. I look forward to attending next year. Maybe I’ll see you there?

Fairy Circles of Doom: Natural or Supernatural?

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You are walking in the woods alone. You come across a circle of mushrooms or a barren circle surrounded by lush greenery. Do you step into the circle? Might seem innocent enough, but lore recommends turning around and heading back home.

Listen, I’m not a wilderness woman. I cannot tell you which poisonous plants and wildlife to avoid, but I can tell you what supernatural spaces and forest demons to avoid when camping. So, get your pen ready…

Fairy Rings

Fairy Rings (also called Fairy Circles, Elf Circles, Elf Rings, or Pixie Rings) are circles of mushrooms that appear in forestland and grassland.

Fairy_ring_on_a_suburban_lawn_100_1851Various cultures attribute fairy rings to supernatural beings: witches, fairies, elves, demons etc. These circles form a space for magical beings to gather, dance, or protect. Any non-magical human who enters the circle will face consequences. Some (somewhat) scary consequences include:

  • If you enter the ring, you will be forced to dance to exhaustion or madness (English and Celtic folklore).
  • If any livestock crosses the fungi boundary, the milk they produce will be sour. That’s where the devil keeps his milk churn, after all (Dutch folklore).
  • If you dance in a fairy circle, you might enter a time warp. You see, fairies live at a different pace. You may leave the circle thinking it has been minutes, but it has actually been days or weeks (“Rhys at the Fairy-Dance”).

Not all fairy rings are bad. Some happy consequences include:

  • If you grow crops around such circles and have cattle feed nearby, you will increase fertility and fortune (Welsh folklore).
  • On Walpurgis Night, witches dance in the circles.

What creates these rings? Austrian folklore says the fire of a dragon, but there are some natural explanations.

A fairy ring is formed when a mushroom spore falls in the right spot and grows a mycelium (“vegetative part of a fungus or fungus-like bacterial colony”) and then spreads tubular threads called hyphae underground. The mushroom caps grow on the edge of the network. Basically, the formation absorbs and pushes the nutrients outwards. When the nutrients are exhausted, the center dies and leaves the ring. The rings can grow up to 33 feet in diameter.

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Circles Without Vegetation

During my research, I came across the phenomenon of barren circles in nature. In these cases, I never heard the word “fairy circle” uttered. Nevertheless, I am going to discuss them (I’m the blog boss).

Devil’s Tramping Ground (North Carolina)

In Bear Creek, North Carolina there is a 120-year-old legend concerning a barren circle of forest ground created by the devil’s tramping. Animals refuse to enter the circle; plants will not grow. If you leave an object in the circle overnight, no matter its weight, it will be thrown from the circle by the next morning. The devil needs room to dance!

Journalist John William Harden (1903–1985) wrote of the spot:

Chatham natives say… that the Devil goes there to walk in circles as he thinks up new means of causing trouble for humanity. There, sometimes during the dark of night, the Majesty of the Underworld of Evil silently tramps around that bare circle– thinking, plotting, and planning against good, and in behalf of wrong. I have heard that boy scouts spent the night there and woke up with their tents a few miles away. There were also some guys who tried to stay up the whole night there. 2 men attempted to stay up all night, but were lulled to sleep by a soft voice.

Devil's Tramping Ground
CC BY-SA 2.5 by user Jason Horne

Would you be brave enough for a campout? In recent years, a journalist (and his two dogs) stayed the night in a tent right in the middle of the circle. He went there to disprove the old legend, but ended up hearing footsteps circle his tent. Other overnight campers reported strange shadowy figures staring at them from the treeline.

Is there a natural explanation for this barren circle? Could heavy traffic and bonfires be the culprit? Soil scientist Rich Hayes, who has run several tests of the site, says it may not be that easy: “The fact that there are written accounts going back hundreds of years about this spot being barren of vegetation makes me think something else is going on here besides people camping and burning big fires.” He argues soil tests do not give any reasons why plants cannot grow there. The mystery continues!

Hoia-Baciu Forest (Transylvania region of Romania)

Hoia-Baciu is called the “Bermuda Triangle of of Transylvania” and was named after a shepherd who disappeared in the forest with a flock of 200 sheep. The Clearing, where trees abruptly stop and surround a barren oval, is by far the creepiest part of the forest. In 1968, a military technician captured a photo of an alleged UFO flying above the clearing and received international attention. The Clearing, according to The Independent, “attracts Romanian witches, sword-wielding Americans, and people who try to cleanse the forest of evil through the medium of yoga.” I have no natural explanation for you concerning this circle, so maybe hold off on your yoga retreat.

The forest itself is home to ghosts. People have also reported losing track of time, electronic devices failing, and random “ectoplasms” floating in the air. One legend says a five-year-old girl was lost in the forest and returned years later, unchanged and wearing the same clothes.

Fairy Circles of Namibia

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CC BY 2.5 by user Stephan Getzin (via Beavis729)

There are mushroom fairy circles and there are these fairy circles: circles created by mysterious grass formations. Until recently, this phenomenon only occurred in the grasslands of the Namib desert of southern Africa. These circular patches can range in size from 7 to 49 feet, dotting the red desert surface like chicken pox.

Folklore says these circles are the footsteps of the gods or poisoned patches caused by dragon breath. These circles are believed to hold spiritual powers.

There are two competing scientific theories behind these circles. One theory is that termites are clearing the area around their nests, creating the circles. Another theory is that plants are competing for water. There was a detailed article about the scientific journey to explain these circles printed in The Atlantic last month. I recommend giving it a read.

Stay out of the forest and don’t walk into fairy circles!